The Benefits of Restoring the Upper Truckee River

River & Environment

  • Restores a 1.5-mile section of the Upper Truckee River as part of a larger multi-reach river restoration effort.
  • Protects Lake Tahoe’s clarity by reducing erosion and sediment input.
  • Reduces golf course turf and decreases area adjacent to the river.
  • Provides a more continuous riverine corridor by moving golf holes away from the river’s edge.
  • Protects fen and wetlands in WMSP, which are outside of the project area.
  • Reconnects the river to its meadow floodplain, restoring water table levels and meadow vegetation.
  • Restores riparian habitat and stream environment zone through restoration of geomorphic function.

Golf

  • Retains and improves the 18-hole championship, Audubon-recognized golf course, with an equivalent par and slope.
  • Updates golf course with water-saving irrigation improvements and replaces old sod and turf.
  • Generates substantial revenue for CA State Parks and local tourism dollars.
  • Boosts the local economy directly and incrementally: approximately 2/3 of golf rounds are played by visitors from out of town. These visitors also spend money on lodging, meals, and additional related tourism that supports the local economy.
  • Generates employment in South Lake Tahoe via both Lake Tahoe Golf Course and golf-related tourism jobs.
  • Replaces course port-o-potty with a new, plumbed restroom.
  • Continues to provide quality golf at an affordable price to the local community and visitors.

Recreation

  • Potential for an ADA-accessible trail paralleling the southeast side of the river, connecting from Highway 50 to a new bridge, leading to trails on the west side of the river, providing greater visitor access to Washoe Meadows State Park with trail access and parking.
  • Removes five erosion-causing, fire-prone, undersized bridges and replaces them with three longer bridges.
  • Creates new recreation access near the clubhouse, including trailhead and picnic tables.
  • Allows for the Clubhouse to become more of a visitor center — a gateway to the Tahoe Basin — and provides more interpretation opportunities.